Care of the Ageing

The MACH is committed to improving personalised care for our increasingly ageing society

 

Across MACH partners there is an active network consisting of global experts with specialisms in the ageing and aged care field across medical disciplines, spanning the full care continuum.

 

This network—overseen locally by the Care of the Ageing committee and linking nationally through the Australian Health Research Alliance (AHRA)—aims to address the ageing and aged care challenges faced by end-users, including patients, carers, health care providers and the general population through innovative, evidence-based research that will have both a significant local and global impact.

 

 

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For further information please contact Nick Walsh nicholas.walsh@unimelb.edu.au

 

Committee

The Care of the Ageing committee is focused on addressing ageing and aged care challenges through a personalised approach to prevention, cure and care for the ageing.

 

Membership consists of multidisciplinary experts covering the translation of health research spectrum 

from basic discovery to implementation into clinical practice in hospitals and the community

Members

Professor Andrea B. Maier - Chair

Personalised care is determining the biological age, the pace somebody ages, and personalized interventions to slow down the ageing process and therewith the onset of age-related diseases will revolutionize health care.

Professor Ashley Bush - Deputy Chair

Personalised medicine is an emphasis of much of my neurodegenerative disease research involving fluid biomarkers, multimodal neuroimaging and neurogenetics in population cohorts such as the Rush Memory and Aging Project, the Swedish BioFinder project, the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative, the Healthy Brain Project, and AIBL.

Barry Baulch - consumer representative

Dr Frances Batchelor

Personalised medicine involves tailoring interventions and care to the needs and preferences and/or goals of the older person. It means understanding the environmental, personal and psychosocial context of the person as this will influence their capacity to take up and/or access interventions and recommendations.

Professor Amy Brodtmann

What does personalised medicine look like in healthy brain aging and cognitive disorders? It means the identification of risk factors for dementia and the development of individualised plans to maintain brain health. It means the identification of accurate biomarkers for early dementia diagnosis and the development of novel treatments, both drug and lifestyle modification, to prevent neurodegeneration. It means supporting patients and their communities throughout the dementia journey.

Professor Gustavo Duque

Personalised care is the multi-dimensional assessment of the patient to identify specific risk factors and co-morbidities aimed to design a tailored care plan that addresses the specific needs and goals of the individual.

Personalised medicine takes into account the illness experience as well as the bio-medical issues.  It requires a partnership between the clinicians and the person, bringing together the medical knowledge with the person's knowledge of what is important to them.  It evaluates the medical realities of the person's health issues, which are then considered by the person in the context of their own preferences and values, resulting in a management plan that is well-understood and to which the person consents.

Professor Martha Hickey

Personalised care is about what matters to the client; it is where they have choice and control in relation to how their care is administered, organised and received. Personalised care is also about developing and maintaining relationships between clients, their health professionals and the health system.

Dr Suzanne Kapp

Personalised care means working with patients to identify their wants, needs and preferences with respect to planning and delivery of healthcare. It also means delivering this care to optimise patient outcomes. 

Professor Meinir Krishnasamy

Personalised care is the multi-dimensional assessment of the patient to identify specific risk factors and co-morbidities aimed to design a tailored care plan that addresses the specific needs and goals of the individual.

 

Personalised nursing involves tailoring interventions and care to the needs and preferences and/or goals of the older person. It means understanding the environmental, personal and psychosocial context of the person as this will influence their capacity to take up and/or access interventions and recommendations.

 

Professor Nicola Lautenschlager

Personalised medicine in my area of expertise means progressing with research to the point where consumers can receive evidence-based, but individualised interventions to effectively improve their mental and cognitive health and with this their quality of life. This approach needs to take into account personal preferences in regards to behaviour change, genetic and biological factors as well as cultural aspects.

Judy McCahon - consumer representative

What does personalised care mean to me as a consumer?

 

Being able to make informed decisions about my own care.

Being able to access quality advice from a GP who I respect and other experts in their fields.

Personalised care is all about ensuring that patients receive high quality and safe care that is based on evidence based clinical trials and implementation science research. Together with clients and healthcare partners, we co-produce research to improve health and well being locally, nationally and internationally.

A/Professor Lucio Naccarella

A personalised approach to medicine and care for the ageing recognises that the required growth in Australia’s aged care workforce to meet the increasing and evolving care needs, wants and expectations of older people, requires evidence-informed: workforce planning, financial planning, service delivery models, and workspace design planning principles and initiatives that will inspire and inform the recruitment, preparation, up-skilling and retaining the next generation of the aged care workforce. 

A/Professor Cathy Said

Personalised medicine will allow early delivery of tailored interventions based on a person’s risk of developing diseases, the rate of biological aging and rate of progression of current health conditions.  This will enable people to optimise their health independence and quality of life as they age.

A/Professor Julia Sarant

Personalised medicine in this field is about patient-centred care; tailoring treatment to individuals and involving their significant others to maximise benefits.

Professor Cassandra Szoeke

Personalised medicine is the ability to look at patient on an individual basis to allow for more accurate identification of risk factors and individualised modification to achieve healthy ageing.

A/Professor Peter van Wijngaarden

Personalised health care places the patient at the centre of care delivery. It recognises that optimal outcomes are achieved through multidisciplinary partnerships that consider the physical, emotional, social and environmental determinants of health. By extension, personalised eye health care recognises that eye health impacts and is impacted by other aspects of health. Many of the leading causes of vision loss and blindness are age-related and the loss of vision can profoundly impact self-care and the quality of life. Advances in cell and gene technologies mean that there are now effective treatments for eye diseases that were previously untreatable. Similarly, innovative digital technologies are enabling remote eye health assessments increasing access and convenience for patients. 

Dr Tanara Vieira Sousa

Bio coming

Dr Paul Yates

For me, personalised medicine involves individualised assessment of health-related strengths and hazards,educating people about their prognoses and treatment options based on these, and undertaking shared decision-making based on their individual situation, preferences and values.

Professor Jeffrey Zajac

Bio coming

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MACH ageing projects  

These projects are supported by the Australian Government’s Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) as part of the Rapid Applied Research Translation program

ABOUT US

MACH is an NHMRC recognised Advanced Health Research and Translation Centre.

The mission of MACH is to improve health and wellbeing by integrating medical research, education and clinical care.

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MACH acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the land on which it works, the Wurundjeri People of the Kulin Nation, and pay respects to its elders past, present and emerging.

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