2019 MACH MRFF

Rapid Applied Research Translation 

Successful Grants & Fellowships

A/Prof Elif Ekinci

MACH Partners: Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Health, Northern Health, St Vincent's Health Melbourne

Project titleCan flash glucose monitoring improve blood glucose control in Indigenous Australians with type 2 diabetes

Summary: Diabetes is a major problem for Indigenous Australians. Flash glucose monitors are easy-to-use, new devices worn on the arm providing real-time blood glucose levels to guide treatment. This project will analyse whether these monitors help Indigenous Australians understand and manage blood glucose levels to avoid complications like heart disease and kidney failure which will likely change the way diabetes is managed for all Indigenous Australians and other high-risk individuals.

About A/Prof Ekinci's Research Project

What is the problem you're trying to solve? 

Diabetes is a major problem for Indigenous Australians. Currently, monitoring blood glucose levels through frequent painful fingerpricks is inconsistent. Flash glucose monitors are easy-to-use, new devices worn on the arm providing real-time blood glucose levels to guide treatment. The project team will analyse whether these monitors help Indigenous Australians understand and manage blood glucose levels to avoid complications like heart disease and kidney failure.

About this research translation project 

Diabetes is a major contributor to the mortality gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The risk and severity of diabetes complications are far greater in Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australians. We urgently need effective and convenient ways of improving diabetes management in Indigenous Australians, a goal of the National Diabetes Strategy. New technologies that continuously monitor blood glucose are effective in assisting people to improve their blood glucose levels by driving changes in behaviour, lifestyle and therapy. The devices are worn on the arm and provide continuous, real-time feedback on blood glucose levels, but have not been tested in Indigenous Australians. Primary outcomes include lower, clinically significant haemoglobin levels with flash glucose monitoring. Secondary outcomes include achieving blood glucose targets, fewer hypoglycaemic episodes, reduced costs, and improved quality of life.

What will be the impact? 

If the results of the larger study demonstrate a reduction in blood glucose levels in Indigenous Australians with diabetes using flash glucose monitors and this strategy is cost effective, then this study will likely change the way diabetes is managed for all Indigenous Australians and other high-risk individuals.

Download this project summary:

For more information on this project, please contact the MACH office:

(03) 8344 9973

mach-admin@unimelb.edu.au

ABOUT US

The MACH is an NHMRC recognised Advanced Health Research and Translation Centre.

The mission of the MACH is to improve health and wellbeing by integrating medical research, education and clinical care.

ADDRESS

187 Grattan Street

Carlton, VIC 3053

 

+61 (0)3 8344 9973

mach-admin@unimelb.edu.au

SUBSCRIBE FOR EMAILS
  • Twitter Social Icon

The MACH acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the land on which it works, the Wurundjeri People of the Kulin Nation, and pay respects to its elders past, present and emerging.

All content copyright © 2018 the Melbourne Academic Centre for Health